Tag Archives: calendar

Cartoon Puzzle Game AZZL from Jutiful Combines Logic, Laffs – Gamasutra

Cartoon Puzzle Game AZZL from Jutiful Combines Logic, Laffs Gamasutra The freaky geniuses from Jutiful are familiar to many as the creators of REBUS - Absurd Logic Game, which earned Best App honors from Apple and Mobile App of the Day from FWA. “It's fresh and original, looks great and toys with your emotions,” said ... and more »

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Snapchat signs one-year deal with NFL, will curate Live Stories including league and fan content; both Snapchat and NFL will sell ads and split…

Are you ready for some football? Snapchat is! Snapchat has landed a one-year deal with the NFL to bring photos and videos from around the league into the company’s Live Stories feature. The deal, which runs through this year’s Super Bowl, means Snapchat will host at least one NFL Live Story each weekend with the possibility for other stories around individual games like Monday or Thursday Night Football. (Snapchat will create a story for Thursday’s Broncos versus Chiefs matchup, for example.) Both Snapchat and the NFL will sell advertising around the stories and split revenue depending on which side brings on the ad partner. Snapchat is high on its Live Stories offering, and now it has some of the most coveted content around — NFL content — as a way to entice more advertisers onto the platform. One thing worth noting, though: The NFL won’t be sharing broadcast footage with Snapchat. So while a fan or NFL employee might snap a play or two from the stands or sideline, professional, TV-quality video won’t be added to the story. Related Media More Football Is Coming to Your Twitter Feed, Courtesy of a New Deal With the NFL By Peter Kafka , Aug 10, 2015, 6:00 AM PDT It is interesting, then, that Snapchat decided to bring the NFL on as a formal partner. It already does these kinds of live stories around major events like the GOP primary debates or NYC Fashion Week, so it’s plausible that Snapchat could have set up these stories on their own without having to share any revenue with the NFL. The benefit of the deal, though, is that the NFL will contribute content to the story that regular fans probably won’t have access to, like pregame or postgame content from the locker room. The benefit to the NFL is easier to understand: Reach. Snapchat’s head of partnerships told Re/code back in June that its Live Stories draw an audience of 20 million people , and that’s a nice addition to the league’s roster of existing deals

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The New York Times and The Guardian Sign On for Google and Twitter’s Instant Article Push (Peter Kafka/Re/code)

The New York Times is working on the new “instant article” format Google and Twitter want to launch this fall . “We’re working with Google and we’re involved as both a publishing and a technology provider,” Times rep Eileen Murphy told Re/code via email. Murphy confirmed that she was referring to Google’s plan to create an open-source “instant article” format that would allow mobile users to quickly pull up stories. The Times itself reports that British newspaper the Guardian is also working with Google and Twitter. The Times and the Guardian were some of the first publishers to join Facebook’s instant articles program last spring. The Google/Twitter plan is seen as response to Facebook’s push, as well as other proprietary publishing programs launched by the likes of Snapchat and Apple. A word about whose program this actually is: Both Google and Twitter executives say both companies are working on the project, and that they hope that a consortium of technology companies eventually embrace the plan. But as Fortune noted earlier today,  publishing executives often speak about the project as a Google-led plan. Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window) Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Contact Peter Kafka: @pkafka | EMAIL Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window) Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Join the conversation:

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GoPro Odyssey, the 16-camera virtual reality rig, costs $15K, launches in early November (Eric Johnson/Re/code)

At Google I/O this year, Google gave a big thumbs-up to GoPro , announcing that the action camera maker would power some of the first 360-degree videos on YouTube. Those videos will be viewable on regular YouTube, but also in virtual reality devices like Google Cardboard and likely others headed to market soon. Google explained back then how its software would make videos filmed in 360 look good, but now we have some new details on what GoPro brings to the table: A sixteen-camera device called GoPro Odyssey, which will cost $15,000 when it launches in early November. You won’t be able to buy the Odyssey off store shelves, however. GoPro plans to sell it only to “select content partners” who apply through the camera’s website . Details on how those content partners will be selected are scant to nonexistent, other than the fact that both Google and GoPro will have a say in the selection. But the limited access program and its verbiage about professional video creators re-raises the question of where the competitive line is between Google VR and Jaunt , a buzzy VR film and camera startup that Google invested in. Previously, it seemed as though Google and GoPro were focusing on a consumer/prosumer crowd, rather than Jaunt’s professional clientele, but now, that doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. Related Media In Google’s Vision of Virtual Reality, Where Does Jaunt Fit? By Eric Johnson , Jun 30, 2015, 6:00 AM PDT Several virtual reality filmmakers have already been using GoPro cameras to make 360-degree videos on their own, often using 3-D printed camera rigs. The face value of the Odyssey’s 16 cameras — 16 GoPro Hero4s — is only $8,000, so where does the other half of its value come from? Maybe we’ll find out once the cameras debut and the content creators who buy it get access to Assembler, Google’s VR video pipeline

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Facebook begins testing new, content-heavy, immersive mobile ad format (Kurt Wagner/Re/code)

Facebook is testing a new, content-heavy mobile ad that wraps a lot of the company’s existing ad formats like image carousels and autoplay video into one product. The ad looks like a Facebook post, but opens into a full screen ad that operates like a mini version of an advertiser’s website, allowing users to scroll through multiple pages of videos, images and text. There are opportunities for users to click away to an external site, but the ad content is primarily hosted on Facebook. Here’s an example of what the the new ad format looks like. This look isn’t entirely new. Facebook showed off something very similar to advertisers at Cannes Lions back in June, but said the ad was a just a mockup. It’s easy to see why Facebook is headed in this direction. For starters, the ad looks much better than a traditional sponsored post within News Feed; Facebook is working with publishers and brands to generate more high-quality content, and ad material is no exception. Plus, it’s likely that the company can charge marketers more for an ad that includes multiple photos and videos (not to mention a full-screen takeover). Facebook is also pushing to host more content as a way to keep users from clicking away to other sites. It is already doing this with news articles, and it’s building a commerce portion of the site to host products as well. These new ads do something similar, but with an advertiser’s website. Ultimately, marketers still need a return on their investment, so it’ll be up to Facebook to prove that hosting an advertiser’s content is a significantly better experience. Facebook is only testing the format with four different advertisers — Michael Kors, Gatorade, Mr

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Microsoft Acquires Organizational Analytics Service VoloMetrix (Frederic Lardinois/TechCrunch)

Microsoft today announced that it has acquired VoloMetrix , a service that specializes in analyzing organizational performance using anonymized data it gathers from across a company’s corporate communications systems. Organization analytics is something Microsoft itself has been looking at, too, and its  Delve organizational analytics service  is currently in preview and scheduled for general release by the end of the year. VoloMetrix, which launched in 2011, had previously raised about $17 million in funding rounds led by Split Rock Partners and Shasta Ventures . The company closed its Split Rock-led $12 million Series B round last October. At the time, the company’s CEO Ryan Fuller told me that it was seeing “tremendous traction in customers using the product to increase sales productivity by deepening their understanding of sales activities and customer relationships, and using it for organizational simplification by understanding the cost of processes, meetings and bureaucracy in their businesses.” In today’s announcement, Fuller argues that joining Microsoft will be “a huge win for our customers as we provide even better solutions going forward.” Similarly, Microsoft argues that “this acquisition will combine VoloMetrix’ experience, technology and track record of success with Office 365 and our previously announced Delve Organizational Analytics.” It’s unclear whether Microsoft plans to fully integrate VoloMetrix into its own Delve product or if it will continue to operate as a stand-alone product. We have asked Microsoft for clarification and will update this post once we hear back. Featured Image: Ken Wolter / Shutterstock

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Android Wear now works with iPhones

The rumors are true: Google has officially announced that Android Wear is coming to the iPhone. But there are a few caveats. For one thing, only the latest iPhones -- those that are running iOS 8.2 and up -- are supported (that includes the iPhone...

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Google to app developers: iOS 9 privacy feature that forces HTTPS can break ads, so add an exception to allow ads to be delivered over HTTP (Mark…

Apple says it cares a lot about privacy . Just ask Tim Cook . Hence, its new iOS 9 operating system will boast a new feature, called App Transport Security, or ATS, which is supposed to require iPhone app developers to use an advanced security protocol. The idea is to keep the operating system lock tight. Google says it cares a lot about privacy, too . And it says Apple is doing the right thing. But Google also says that not every app developer and mobile publisher will be able to work with Apple’s new standards, at least not yet. So, when those app publishers that aren’t running the protocol meet Apple’s new encryption, their mobile ads won’t run. No ads, less revenue. On Wednesday, Google gave publishers a pointer . It published the five lines of code to disable Apple’s encryption, offering them a “short-term fix” before they get up to speed with the security rules that both Apple and Google are pushing. (It should be noted: Disabling the protocol doesn’t appear to violate Apple’s rules.) That fix ticked off some people in the security world, who saw it as an attempt by Google to prioritize ads over privacy. Late on Thursday, Google added this caveat to its post : “We wrote this because developers asked us about resources available to them for the upcoming iOS 9 release, and we wanted to outline some options. To be clear, developers should only consider disabling ATS if other approaches to comply with ATS standards are unsuccessful.” Both companies say they’re moving toward the same goalpost on mobile security

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Facebook tests a video matching tool with select partners that finds clips uploaded without owner’s permission (Peter Kafka/Re/code)

A year after it started making a big push into video, Facebook is acknowledging it has a video piracy problem. And it says it’s going to start fixing it. Facebook is rolling out a “video matching technology” that will let content owners tell Facebook that a video clip belongs to them, and take it down if it’s not supposed to be there. It’s the first step to creating the equivalent of YouTube’s Content ID system, which the video giant built up over years as a response to its own copyright/piracy problems. After years of ignoring video, Facebook is now a major player, so this kind of effort was obvious and overdue . “We’ve heard from some of our content partners that third parties too frequently misuse their content on Facebook,” Facebook said in a blog post today. “It’s not fair to those who work hard to create amazing videos. We want creators to get credit for the videos that they own.” Over the past year Facebook has encouraged users to post and view videos on its own player, and in April it said  Facebook users were watching four billion clips a day ; industry observers assume the number is much bigger now. Facebook’s anti-piracy rollout is just starting, and its partners say they have just started testing the new technology, which requires content owners to upload the clips they want to protect into Facebook’s system. In order for Facebook to fully replicate YouTube’s Content ID system, it will have to create a way for content owners to leave their stuff up on the site, and share ad revenue the clips generate. That requires a lot of business development work, and Facebook isn’t close to getting that together yet — it’s only starting, for instance, to figure out ways to share ad revenue with video owners. Facebook’s response comes after video makers and distributors have grown increasingly vocal about pirated videos, which by one estimate accounted for more than 70 percent of Facebook’s most popular videos . In May, Jukin Media, a video licensing agency best known for “Fail” clips , described Facebook’s copyright problems as “ massive .” In June, Fullscreen CEO George Strompolos, who runs one of the biggest YouTube video networks, tweeted that he was “getting very tired of seeing our videos ripped there with no way to monitor or monetize.” Now Facebook says Jukin and Fullscreen are two of its initial launch partners for the new technology, along with Zefr , a service company that helps content owners track their clips on YouTube. Facebook says it is also working with major media companies on the effort, but won’t identify them. “It’s early,” said Strompolos, a former YouTube executive

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