Tag Archives: entrepreneurship

The Henry Ford Announces William Davidson Foundation Initiative for…

The Henry Ford announced today the launch of the William Davidson Foundation Initiative for Entrepreneurship, made possible by a $1.5 million grant from the foundation, that allows the institution to... (PRWeb February 14, 2019) Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/the_henry_ford_announces_william_davidson_foundation_initiative_for_entrepreneurship/prweb16093481.htm

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Don’t fear the big company ‘kill zones’

Ed Byrne Contributor Share on Twitter Ed Byrne is an entrepreneur, investor and co-founder of Scaleworks . Do you worry about the so-called “kill zones” of big tech companies? The Economist  thinks you should . The theory basically suggests that if your product or service is anyway threatening or accretive to one of these incumbents,  they will either force-buy your company or clone it and destroy your market. Any entrepreneur that believes this should probably pack up now before it’s too late —  if it’s not a “kill-shot,” it will be some other perceived death-knell that ruins your company. Starting a company has never been easier. But growing a sustainable business is still difficult  —  as it should be. If you build something customers will pay for ,  you’re going to attract competition from copycats and incumbents. Consider it another type of validation, like product-market fit: competitors think we’re right. Welcome to being an entrepreneur  —  you are going to be constantly battling  –  lack of cash, lack of customers, aggressive competition, better-funded competitors, underperforming staff, slow-moving sales cycle, or some other as-yet-unknown. The list of pitfalls is long. But enough willpower and perseverance — “blood, sweat and tears” —  will get you to the other side. Eventually.

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July sets a record for number of $100M+ venture capital rounds

Jason Rowley Contributor Jason Rowley is a venture capital and technology reporter for Crunchbase News . More posts by this contributor WeWork is just one facet of SoftBank’s bet on real estate Inside the rise and reign of supergiant venture capital rounds In July 2018, the tech sector’s leisure class — venture capitalists — kicked investments into overdrive, at least when it comes to financing supergiant venture rounds of $100 million or more (in native or as-converted USD values). With  55 deals  accounting for just over $15 billion at time of writing, July likely set an all-time record for the number of huge venture deals struck in a single month. The table below has just the top 10 largest rounds from the month. (A full list of all the supergiant venture rounds can be found here .) It’s certainly a record high for the past decade. Earlier this month, we set out to find  when the current mega-round trend began . We found that, prior to the tail end of 2013, supergiant VC rounds were relatively rare. In a given month between 2007 and the start of the supergiant round era, a $100 million round would be announced every few weeks, on average. And many months had no such deals come across the wires. Of course, that hasn’t been the case recently. Why is this happening? As with most things in entrepreneurial finance, context matters. There are some obvious factors to consider. At the later-stage end of the spectrum,  the market is currently awash in money . Billions of dollars in dry powder is in the offing as venture investors continue to raise new and ever-larger venture funds

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There are very real differences in how women and men (and VCs) view entrepreneurship, underscores a new survey

In the increasingly crowded world of venture capital, many more firms are producing research as a way to differentiate themselves from the pack. Earlier this year, for example,  Wing,  a venture firm that focuses primarily on enterprise startups, published a state of the industrial IoT market . The consumer-tech investment firm Goodwater Capital  is becoming known for its occasional equity research report on a still-private company . Now Illuminate Ventures , a nine-year-old, woman-led, early-stage venture firm that’s focused on enterprise cloud and mobile computing startups, has produced some thought-provoking research of its own around how women and male founders view entrepreneurship, from why they do it to how much support they receive from family members. First, a little about Illuminate’s methodologies. According to firm founder Cindy Padnos, the firm initially reached out to 1,200 tech founders and venture capitalists who Illuminate presented with a litany of questions about entrepreneurship and motivations and challenges that people face in starting companies. In the end, says Padnos, Illuminate had a response rate of just more than 30 percent, or slightly over 400 completed responses, which it used SurveyMonkey tools to collect. Roughly half the responses came from partner-level VCs at 150 different venture firms; the other half came from U.S.-based founders who raised venture funding in 2017. So what did they have to say? A lot. If we’re being honest, the survey was so wide-ranging as to be a bit overwhelming. (You can check out the full paper here .) In the meantime, some of the most interesting takeaways can be grouped into a couple of different categories. One of these seems to disprove old myths. Among them: The belief that entrepreneurs launch companies chiefly for financial gain is seemingly a myth. Only 15 percent of male founders and 2 percent of the female founders who responded to the survey said that money is their primary motivation.

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